A collection of Recipes by Deborah Dolen

Master Tonic Recipe for Flu by Deborah Dolen

This is a Master Tonic Syrup Recipe great for pre and post flu situations and one of author Deborah Dolen’s most popular formulas downloaded over a million times on the net.

Everyone needs a flu game plan and the most overlooked strategy is to have a plan already in place before you or a loved one falls ill. Meaning, create your syrups, tinctures and healing foods before you or loved one falls ill. This will save you a lot of money and give you a final product superior to anything you could buy that purports to be ready made.  Prevention is always best, I wipe everything down with Ethanol or a high proof grain alcohol if I am working behind anyone sick.

Making a freezing “Chicken Soup for the Soul” for example, is wise. Syrups and tinctures can also be frozen if you leave enough head space. I built the recipe below based on several theories I discuss later and from two of my most downloaded recipes, one enjoying over half a million downloads over a ten year period. My recipe below is dependent on honey, (organic is best,) and apple cider vinegar’s, (I find Bragg’s Apple Cider Vinegar to be the best as far as apple cider vinegar’s go.) Between the sweet and the sour base – and the Italian herbs known to best ward off any virus, your concoctions may seem like salad dressing but nevertheless, palatable. Drinking lots of distilled water [as 40% of our viruses come from our own tap water !!] is important as well as major hand washing. I carry ethanol with me because once it evaporates, it kills any microorganisms that may be on door knobs, toilet seat handles, or even computer keyboards. You can get 190 proof grain alcohol [ethanol] in most states at the alcohol store under the brand “Everclear” or “Mohawk.” 150 proof will do for states that prohibit the sale of 190 proof. Salt is also an under-marketed healing practice in conjunction with distilled water is great for gargling.

Back to the construction of this recipe, seven years ago I studied botany in London under Napier & Culpeppers and among many herbal related skills – I learned how to make tinctures. Back then the avian flu virus [H5N1] was of most concern to me and I read that people in 3rd world countries handling herbs as a daily job [mainly the Italian family of herbs] were not succumbing to the Avian Virus as were other members of their family who had a different career. The culinary herbs they were handling seemed to have great biopotency against viruses and those herbs included rosemary , oregano, thyme, and basil to name a few. Some of these botanicals are known to contain certain compounds that do fight the flu. I found this interesting, coupled with 1800′s story of the “Toulouse Thieves” who were immune from the black plague because they dosed themselves with a certain solution before they went off to pillage from the dying.

Regarding the “Toulouse Thieves” the carrier may have been the secret, which was a highly acidic vinegar. Since then many people have recreated this “body splash” only to omit which could be the most important part of the recipe – the vinegar, and replace it with better smelling alcohol. Vinegar may smell but it has a high acid content does prevent any form of life from living in it. Citric acid has become my favorite vinegar alternative, not smelling and still being high in acid. Honey is also a good carrier and fairly recognized as a natural antibiotic in and of its own right. If using honey as your “base” be careful to not over heat it and try to keep under 110 degrees if possible, to retain beneficial properties. Chicken broth also has great flu fighting properties and when I use this as a “base” I try to buy a small organic chicken and just pressure cook it to secure the broth I am after. So basically, I like vinegar, honey or chicken broth as my “carriers” for medicinal type syrups and foods and ethanol to clean. In this article I am combing two of my most popular recipes for ease. Syrup d’Pastore named after a wonderful reader of mine [Kari Pastor] who became a life long friend and a Master Tonic Recipe that has enjoyed over half a million downloads in ten years written under my pen name Mabel White. For good reasons you will be making two different infusions and then mixing them together. This is because some botanical properties infuse more beneficially in honey, while the same botanical offers other beneficial properties when infused in vinegar. If you are in a hurry, you can just throw this all together and perhaps use a crock pot on its lowest setting.

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Flavor? You can actually add flavor and that is optional. The flavor of raspberry or apricot seem to compliment all of the components below the best. Elderberry is the absolute best if you can even find it in syrup or preserve form because of its medicinal properties.   To add flavor, just add a jar of preserves to the entire vinegar side. Sugar free preserves would be more ideal. I love boysenberry so I get the Smuckers Boysenberry preserves or syrup when I make this preparation. You will be straining all of this anyway. For straining I recommend a chinios and a pestle. Cheesecloth or a coffee filter is fine if you cannot secure a chinios.

*You may want to have sterile bottles or jars already waiting. To quickly make mason jars sterile I microwave the glass for four minutes and just allow them to cool where they are. Mason jar lids I dip in Ethanol and allow to sit out to dry. I pull them out with tongs, as not to touch them.

**Please note vegetable glycerin can be used in place of honey. In the United Kingdom, many people have access to vegetable glycerin and make their own cough syrups with that material. I do not feel it is a beneficial as honey, but still very calming to the throat.

*** Ginseng if you can even get it – is awesome.

I am a “parts” girl [as in parts per million] but for those who needed measurements, they are listed to the right of the ingredient. Herbs are far more fluffier than non-herbs is why it all says one part in appearance – but when you weigh them, they do weigh very different.

Makes – About 40 ounces of Master Tonic Syrup

Vinegar Part 1 – 24 ounces of Apple Cider Vinegar

Using all fresh herbs:

1 part Garlic [2 Ounces]
1 part White Onion [2 ounces]
1 part grated Ginger Root [2 ounces]
1 part chopped Cayenne Pepper [2 ounces]
1 part grated Horseradish root [2 ounces]
1 part Basil [1 ounce]
1 part Rosemary [1 ounce]
1 part Thyme [1 ounce]
1 part fresh lemon peels [2 ounce]
1 part Cinnamon [optional - helps calm the stomach] [1 ounce]

On the lowest stove setting, cover herbs with apple cider vinegar and allow to infuse. You can macerate the botanicals a bit if you like before hand, in a blender. I prefer to macerate first and I use a “Ninja” blender to do this. The same is true for part II, below.

Honey Part 2 24 ounces of Honey

Using all fresh herbs:

1 part Garlic [2 Ounces]
1 part White Onion [2 ounces]
1 part grated Ginger Root [2 ounces]
1 part chopped Cayenne Pepper [2 ounces]
1 part grated Horseradish root [2 ounces]
1 part Basil [1 ounce]
1 part Rosemary [1 ounce]
1 part Thyme [1 ounce]
1 part fresh lemon peels [2 ounce]
1 part Cinnamon [optional - helps calm the stomach] [1 ounce]
and allow to infuse.

Cook both on as low as possible, even turning heat off an on for two hours. You can smash them up a bit. After straining both very carefully – mix them in a 1:1 ratio, meaning one part vinegar recipe to one part honey recipe. Pour into sterilized bottles, such as mason jars and
store in refrigerator.

Dose – a few tablespoons four times a day is good. Inclusion of cinnamon may be necessary if nausea is an issue.